healthy goals

For just over a year I’ve tried to stick to a modified plant-based diet. Along the way, I ended up deciding to add back in small amount of fish and eggs (for protein and iron), but otherwise, I more or less committed to healthier plant-based eating habits. However, recent travel in Europe and general convenience led to me eat a bit more cheese than I’ve planned.

That said, I’m ready to start feeling better and eating better, so I have some new healthy goals! One way to help achieve a goal is to make your intensions know; build in some accountability. Which is why I’m sharing my goals with you all today.

Restaurant De Kas Amsterdam #100DaysofMiaPrima

Goal #1: Increase my iron and protein intake

How? Include at least one serving of iron and protein-rich food a day, along side vitamin C (to help absorb the iron)

Foods: tuna, salmon, spinach

Timeline + Measure: Feel noticeably more energized mid-day and during workouts by June 1st

 

Goal #2: Improve digestion

How? Include at least one serving of high fiber food a day. Drink ginger tea four time or more a week. Decrease cheese intake to one meal a day or less.

Foods: oatmeal, whole wheat bread, veggies

Timeline + Measure: Evening stomach issues occur less frequently by June 1st

 

What are your health goals?

 

Cheers!

Sarah

This post is #38 of the #The100DayProject. For more updates on my progress, be sure to follow me on Instagram and look for the hashtage, #100DaysofMiaPrima.

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Vegan Snacking: 10 Snacks That Will Make You Forget Potato Chips

Adventures in Plant-Based Nutrition

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the power of food

Power of Food: Jamie Oliver quotation

Since I’ve run out of British detective shows to watch lately, I’ve turned to documentaries and TED Talks for my evening relaxation. While learning about Viking explorers, the evolution of humans, the “moral molecule,” and a secret river under Dublin has been quite riveting, the video I watched this evening struck a deeper cord. Jamie Oliver’s TED talk on the power of food (to do good or, as is often the case in this country, bad) renewed my vigor for healthy living and eating. I’ve been following (more or less- cookie butter is a weakness, okay!?) a plant-based diet for six months now, and contrary to what you might think, this lifestyle has introduced me to so many new ways of cooking, new food to try, and new methods to make eating and cooking easier, more delicious, and fun. I’ve felt better, ran faster (marathon PR!), and found the joy of making a home cooked meal. I love Jamie’s approach to the power of food: that it should be a part of the daily ritual that makes our lives rich and interesting. And healthy.

Cheers!

Sarah

p.s. Jamie’s website has some great vegan recipes as well! Here are the ones I’m particularly excited to try:

No-Bake Vegan Chocolate Fudge Bars

Vegan Blueberry Pancakes

The Best Vegan Burger

Vegan Shepherds Pie

Because I Can: Pittsburgh Marathon Highlights

Because I Can: Pittsburgh Marathon Highlights miaprimacasa.com

Has it already been two weeks since I crossed the finish line of the Pittsburgh Marathon? A lot has happened since then, including an amazing trip to Europe to visit my sister. I can’t wait to tell you all about our adventures in The Netherlands and Italy, but before I do, I want to share some highlights from my second full marathon.

I don’t think I’ve ever had more fun at a race, ever. I didn’t think things would pan out that way. This was the first race where no one was waiting for me at the finish line…and the first major race I wasn’t running with my sister. I figured I’d get the race done and move on to my next race (triathlon, maybe?), no big whoop. Except that right from the beginning I didn’t feel like I was running alone. My friends and family signed up for text alerts that let them know the second I crossed certain milestones in the race, my coworkers were running the half marathon and although they weren’t along side me for the race, it was a comfort to know they were there, and, of course, I was running with thousands of other people. No matter how many races I run, I will always be in awe of completing a single, grueling task with thousands of strangers. We were all there to do one thing: finish the race. It doesn’t matter how long it took us to get to that start line or what problems we had to face or why were really there at all. What matters is that we are there, pushing ourselves to our limit. And we aren’t doing it alone.

Endurance running can often be a long, lonely sport, but in the end, it’s the community that keeps me coming back to the start line.

“Why are we doing this again?” A young female runner next to me asked. I was standing in my coral with minutes to the start, talking with the only two veteran marathon runners I could find nearby (the coral was a mixture of half, relay, and full runners).

We all laughed. Amused at our own tenacity, courage, insanity, whatever.

“Because we can,” replied the middle-aged woman next to me. “I could be in a wheel chair right now. Or going through chemo therapy. But I’m not.”

And isn’t running for 26.2 miles straight the ultimate gesture of thankfulness? Thankfulness for our health, our self-discipline, our support.

Nope, endurance running isn’t lonely. Sure, I’m the one who gets the metal at the end, but if I could give one to every person who inspired and supported me through my journey to the finish (and the start), I would. Or even better, I’d ask them to go out and try for their own metal. No matter if it’s a 5k or an ultra, finishing a race is an experience you will never forget.

Cheers!

Sarah

Two Hundred Miles

Two hundred miles. That’s how many miles I’ve run to get to the start line of tomorrow’s marathon. Two hundred.

At mile six, when I’m thinking, “Oh God, I’ve still got three and a half hours to go!” I’m going to think of those two hundred. At mile 17, when I wonder if I can make it the last nine, I’m going to remind myself of the those two hundred. At mile, 25, when 1.2 seems like it will never come, I have to think of those two hundred. Because 26.2 is nothing compared to all the work I’ve done to get here.

14 hours to go, guys! Keep me in your thoughts at 7am tomorrow!

p.s. I’m loving my race day outfit for marathon #2. Showing off some aerie pride!

Keepin' it real for race day! #aerie #aeriereal #marathon #26.2 miaprimcasa.com#aeriereal tank, Moving Comfort sports bra, Under Armour compression shorts, VSX fanny pack, Brooks Ghost running shoes, Balega compression socks, Nike visor, Stinger energy gels

One Does Not Simply (Run) Into Mordor

19 days and counting.

That’s a mere nineteen days until the Pittsburgh Marathon, when I will run (and admittedly, thanks to a persisting leg injury, walk) 26.2 miles. This will be my second full marathon, but the journey has been no less challenging and no less exhilarating. I completed a 20 mile run (!) this past weekend and will (THANK GOD) begin to taper starting this week. But don’t let that fool you, my taper includes a 16 mile run this weekend. 🙂

Well said, Boromir

But what’s running for four hours straight anyway? To those who have never experienced it, I like to describe it as no different that doing any one thing for hours on end. At a certain point you just keep going and going. You stop thinking about the action.

To me, it’s not unlike trying to read the complete Lord of the Rings trilogy in one sitting. At some point, eating and going to the bathroom become second priorities to finding out what happens to your beloved characters. Usually, you enjoy the ride, but at some point the battle scenes start to feel too long and your eyes begin to glaze over the lyrics to another one of Tolkein’s songs. But you just keep reading.

After all, Frodo throwing the ring into the firry pit is obviously the objective, but becoming a spectator to the battle of Helm’s Deep or a sighing over a smoldering love affair between Arwen and Aragorn or witnessing Frodo and Sam hiding among the rocks in Mordor FOR THE THOUSANDTH TIME was part of the journey. You can’t really get to Mordor without it.

Running to Mordor

Did I really just describe the marathon finish line as Mordor?!

Well, hell, it basically is. There’s just a lot more cheering and a lot less fire. But in the end, you sure do feel like you just saved the Shire.

Cheers!

Sarah

“It is a strange fate that we should suffer so much fear and doubt over so small a thing. Such a little thing.”